Why not consider electric utility monopolies

Publications of the project: Municipal infrastructure companies between energy transition and demographic change (KOMIED) - Industrial economic analyzes with microdata from energy, water and waste management

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DIW weekly report 20/2016

Hardly any cost advantages through company mergers in the drinking water supply

With more than 6,000 supply companies, the drinking water supply in Germany is highly fragmented. This raises questions about possible cost advantages of a consolidation of the sector and the resulting price reduction opportunities for consumers. In this context, the Monopolies Commission has already recommended consolidation of the sector. So far, however ...

2016 | Michael Zschille
DIW weekly report 20/2016

No differences in efficiency between public and private energy supply companies

The expansion of municipal economic activity in the energy supply is often viewed critically. It is assumed that public companies have fewer incentives to produce services more efficiently than private companies. This could result in excessive costs and end customer prices. New microdata from German energy supply companies allow for the first time ...

2016 | Astrid Cullmann, Maria Nieswand, Stefan Seifert, Caroline Stiel
DIW weekly report 20/2016

Trend towards (re-) communalization in energy supply: a myth?

After many municipalities had privatized their energy supply companies in the 1990s, there is now often talk of a paradigm shift. Cities and municipalities are therefore considering putting the supply of electricity, water, gas and heat back into the hands of public companies. The cities of Berlin and Hamburg are two prominent examples of this. But there is a general ...

2016 | Astrid Cullmann, Maria Nieswand, Stefan Seifert, Caroline Stiel
DIW weekly report 20/2016

Focus on municipal energy and water supply: Editorial

A modern infrastructure is the basis for Germany's prosperity and competitiveness. The public and private companies in the energy and drinking water supply make a decisive contribution to this. Your mission to ensure a comprehensive, high-quality and affordable supply of energy and water affects central areas of life for citizens as well as production conditions ...

2016 | Astrid Cullmann, Maria Nieswand, Caroline Stiel, Michael Zschille
DIW weekly report 43/2015

No decline in investments in municipal energy and water supply

A considerable proportion of public investments - outside the public budget - are made by municipal companies, such as municipal utilities. An important investment area is the energy and water supply, as the companies have considerable tangible assets in the pipeline infrastructure. Based on microdata available for the first time, this report shows ...

2015 | Astrid Cullmann, Maria Nieswand, Caroline Stiel
DIW weekly report 6/2015

No barriers to investment in electricity and gas distribution networks thanks to incentive regulation

Since the beginning of 2009, the energy supply in Germany has been subject to incentive regulation, which is intended to ensure the efficient operation of electricity and gas networks. However, it is unclear how the changed regulatory framework will affect the network operators' investment behavior. Against this background, the investment activity ...

2015 | Astrid Cullmann, Nicola Dehnen, Maria Nieswand, Ferdinand Pavel
DIW Economic Bulletin 20/2016

No Differences in Efficiency Between Public and Private Utilities

The increase in municipal economic activity in the utilities sector frequently comes under scrutiny. It is presumed that public utilities have less incentive to provide efficient service than private companies. This could result in excessive costs and prices for end users. New microdata on German energy supply companies allow to conduct an empirical analysis for the whole of Germany for the first time. ...

2016 | Astrid Cullmann, Maria Nieswand, Stefan Seifert, Caroline Stiel
DIW Economic Bulletin 20/2016

A (Re) Municipalization Trend among Energy Utilities: Truth or Myth?

In the 1990s, a number of municipalities started privatizing their energy utilities; In recent years, there has been an intense debate about whether a paradigm shift has taken place since then. Cities and municipalities have considered putting the energy, water, gas and heat supply back into the hands of public companies; Berlin and Hamburg are two prominent examples. But is there really an overarching ...

2016 | Astrid Cullmann, Maria Nieswand, Stefan Seifert, Caroline Stiel

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