What is the number of the non-emergency police

What is the local police number?


02/11/2010 12:35 PM - Started by Albi from Kiel
What I need in this context is a nationwide uniform number for the police, not an emergency number.

Suppose I had a car accident with an unclear question of guilt or some other reason that the police had to come without the blue light. What's the local number?

Or I'm sitting on the train and notice something that has to be reported, for example a theft, but it's not an emergency for life and limb.

What number is there centrally? Which area code am I in?
[1] Beschder answers Albi from Kiel
I would ask 110 or 112 with stoic calm.
[1.1] Telly responds to complaints
User Beschder wrote:
I would ask 110 or 112 with stoic calm.

As far as I know, they use 112 for emergency calls. Many get it wrong. As a child I also learned that 112 was for the fire department. But it applies to all emergency calls. When reporting emergency calls to 110, they connect or forward the information to 112; but valuable time is lost in the process.

So I would also choose 110 in the cases you mentioned.

Telly
[1.2] Superkolbi answers complaint
User Beschder wrote:
I would ask 110 or 112 with stoic calm.

Which in Bavaria does not (yet) always lead to the desired help.
Under 110 you get the police, but under 112 only the fire brigade. For an ambulance you have to choose 19222.
However, the first integrated control centers (ILS) have already been set up under the number 112.
Emergency calls coming from the cellular network are then routed to the ILS via 112.
https://www.bayern-ils.de/ILSWebseite/downloads/extern/Gesetze/09_01_01_ILSG.pdf
[2] KlausCall answers Albi from Kiel

changed once on 02/11/2010 11:33 pm
In the train, for example, the local police are not responsible.
The federal police have the same phone number
0800 6 888 000
They can also reach the offices of the state police.
[3] Bergrocker answers Albi from Kiel
The local police (i.e. the state police) do not (yet) have a uniform national phone number (except for 110 for emergency calls).
In principle, all emergency calls can be reported using both emergency numbers (110 and 112). A corresponding forwarding of the call or forwarding of the emergency takes place immediately.
In order not to lose valuable time, however, you should preselect yourself. In an emergency, you can reach the police at 110 and the fire brigade, ambulances and emergency doctors at 112.
However, these numbers are for emergencies only. In all other situations (e.g. accident without injuries and only with property damage) the police must be informed via the normal exchange line. If necessary, this must be requested via information. The 110 is not a switching center because the lines must remain free for emergencies.
Disturbances or traffic obstructions (e.g. parking, etc.) are the responsibility of the public order office in most cities, which can be reached around the clock in larger cities (e.g. Frankfurt / M.)
[3.1] Albi from Kiel answers Bergrocker
Yes, that's exactly how I mean my question. It's just not that easy with the information either. On the one hand it is very expensive and on the other hand I have the problem: "I'm on the Autobahn XXX behind the entrance / exit YYY in the direction of ZZZ and am looking for the number of the nearest police station".

I also wrote that 112 is the correct number in emergencies. I'm looking for a uniform number for the police (significant traffic accident without injuries but with an unclear question of guilt) and possibly an ambulance that automatically connects based on location. If I or someone else gets a sprained foot while hiking, that is certainly not a life-threatening circumstance that justifies 112.

Albi

User Bergrocker wrote:
The local police (i.e. the state police) do not (yet) have a uniform national phone number (except for 110 for emergency calls). In principle, all emergency calls can be reported using both emergency numbers (110 and 112). A corresponding forwarding of the call or forwarding of the emergency takes place immediately. In order not to lose valuable time, however, you should preselect yourself. In an emergency you can reach the police on 110 and the fire brigade, ambulances and emergency doctors on 112. However, these numbers are only for emergencies. In all other situations (e.g. accident without injuries and only with property damage) the police must be informed via the normal exchange line. If necessary, this must be requested via information. The 110 is not a switching center because the lines must remain free for emergencies. Disturbances or traffic obstructions (e.g. parking, etc.) are the responsibility of the public order office in most cities, which is around the clock in larger cities
can be reached (e.g. Frankfurt / M.)
[3.1.1] Bergrocker answers Albi from Kiel
I know, unfortunately, the information is very expensive and with the information you can be lucky if you know the motorway at all.
There is always a risk of further accidents on the motorway if, for example, cars are standing sideways after an accident. Therefore, the use of the 110 or 112 would be justified here, at the latest when, as you write, you need an ambulance.
Don't be afraid to call 110 or 112 if you don't have an emergency. You say this at the beginning of the conversation and then immediately get the number where to call or, if necessary, direct help.
112 is generally not correct in emergencies, therefore my explanations in the previous article: 110 = police (e.g. robbery, robbery, burglars at the plant etc.), 112 = ambulance, fire brigade, ambulance.
The police would forward it and vice versa. But valuable time is wasted and the rescue control center can ask more specific questions in the event of a medical emergency, thanks to better training, in order to send special workers along if necessary. The 110 is operated by police officers, the 112 by rescue workers (50% rescue workers 50% fire brigade).
Don't get me wrong, but I work in such a control center and can therefore incorporate certain experiences. Hence the tips for saving time from someone who answers the calls himself.
I agree with you that an e.g. 0800 number or e.g. 111 or 119 or ??? for questions about the responsible police station would be a useful thing. This would create a further filtering between "normal cases" and emergencies, which the control center employees also benefit from.
[3.1.1.1] Telly replies to Bergrocker
Don't get me wrong, but I work in such a control center and can therefore incorporate certain experiences. Hence the tips for saving time from someone who answers the calls himself.

If you work in such a control center, then I think it's great that you post this here. Just as you described it, it has been presented again and again in the media for years. And it gives me the assurance that I would use the 110 or 112 correctly after all.

I agree with you that an e.g. 0800 number or e.g. 111 or 119 or ??? for questions about the responsible police station would be a useful thing. This would create a further filtering between "normal cases" and emergencies, which the control center employees also benefit from.

However, that would be very helpful. So I've called 110 twice in the last 10 years to tell them that there was an obstacle on the road somewhere. If I had had to research another number here, then I would have just passed it, like most of them.

And I was treated very kindly and in a conversation I also received a "thank you". That's how it should be.

At this point, I just want to praise the control centers and the employees, who are all behind the scenes and help ensure that our society works.

Back to the statement. A number other than 110 would make sense here.

Telly
[3.1.1.2] niveaulos answers Bergrocker
112 is generally not correct in emergencies, so my explanations in the previous article: 110 = police (e.g. robbery, robbery, burglars at the plant, etc.), 112 = ambulance, fire brigade, emergency doctor.


This would then contradict the provisions of the so-called Euro emergency number - and these are clearly defined in Section 108 of the Telecommunications Act (as mentioned elsewhere, there are only exceptions for Bavaria). According to the system, ALL types of emergency calls must be answered on 112 or forwarded from there to the responsible authorities. That is why it is basically irrelevant who operates the respective control center, as long as the forwarding then works. Incidentally, there also seem to be regional differences. In some places there are separate control centers for the 110 emergency call and 112 emergency call, whereby the 112 then has the option - and by law must also have - to forward a call directly to the other control center. In many regions, however, there are now joint control centers where everything comes out. We only recently switched here, I accompanied it from local politics at the time, so far there have been three separate control centers (1x police and 2x fire brigade / emergency call because once for the city area and once for the surrounding district) and have recently been all three housed in the same room in the same building.

Another reason to dial 112 is the legally prescribed prioritization of the call: If 112 is dialed - for example with high network load - another connection is immediately disconnected if necessary because calls to 112 must be forwarded with the highest priority. However, this does not apply to the 110. In practice, one or the other network operator may still do this - but there is no legal obligation to do so, it is only clearly regulated for the 112.

In addition, the separate 110 is only available in the classic landline network anyway - in mobile communications and with most SIP providers it does not exist as a separate number with an independent call destination - if you dial 110 there is simply a simple call diversion to 112 - and is then passed on to a regionally accessible control center.
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