Why do I always get muscle lumps

Lumps and swellings on the neck and neck

If a knot can be felt, threatening thoughts always arise. However, lumps and swellings on the neck and neck do not only occur in the course of a tumor disease. In many cases there is a comparatively harmless cause: for example a lymph node inflammation or cyst.

Throat cysts are mucus-filled remnants of prenatal development. Medium (median) cervical cysts usually hang under the hyoid bone and move when you swallow. They are often discovered in childhood. Lateral (lateral) neck cysts are located on the side of the neck and are often only noticeable in adulthood. Sometimes the cysts have a passage (neck fistula) to the outside of the neck that looks like a pimple and secretes slimy fluid. Bacteria can migrate through the fistula and lead to a purulent inflammation. To prevent this from happening, doctors usually advise removing cysts in the neck early on.

Swelling in the neck can be caused by an air sac (Laryngocele), a sac in the larynx that is filled with air. Laryngoceles are congenital or acquired, the latter v. a. with glass blowers or wind musicians, professions in which the larynx is under pressure for many hours every day. Surgical removal is only necessary if there are complaints.

Even with one acute thyroid inflammation the neck area swells. Usually bacteria are responsible; they usually get from their original site of infection via the blood or lymphatic system, e.g. B. the tonsils or sinuses, into the thyroid tissue. The disease typically manifests itself in a renewed increase in fever following an infection that has already subsided, accompanied by painful swelling of the thyroid gland.

If the swelling is in the neck, there may be one Myogelosis underlying. This punctual, painful muscle hardening occurs as a result of overexertion or improper strain on the muscles. Unfavorable postures at the computer workstation are often responsible for myogelosis in the neck area. In this case, an improvement in workplace ergonomics helps.

Symptoms, their causes, measures and self-help

  • Painless, doughy or resilient Swelling at the bottom of the chin

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  • Painless, rough to rock hard Lump at the bottom of the chin

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  • (Pressure) painful, single nodules on the underside of the chin; possibly toothache or pain in the rest of the oral cavity; sometimes recurring

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  • Strong painful, plump to hard Swelling on the bottom of the chin; possibly fever, difficulty swallowing

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  • Painless swelling on the front of the neck, moving with swallowing; possibly tightness; possibly weight loss, nervousness, sweating or weight gain, slowing down and freezing

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  • Painless, growing lump on anterior neck; possibly hoarseness; sometimes loud inhalation noise, difficulty swallowing

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  • Painless swelling on the front neck, can be expressed and fill it with air by pressing

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  • Sudden onset of swelling with a feeling of tightness on the front neck

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  • Painful, widespread swelling of the anterior neck with fever; often earache; often difficulty swallowing

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  • Moderately tender nodules or swellings on the side of the neck; often signs of cold, moderate to severe sore throat; often fever

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  • Painless swelling or (mostly) numerous swelling Lumps on the side of the neck and / or above the collarbones; possibly general complaints such as fever, fatigue, night sweats

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  • Painless individual, (mostly) smooth knots on the side of the neck and / or above the collarbones

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  • Painless, permanent swelling on the side of the neck, combined with regurgitation of undigested bites

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  • Severely tender, increasing swelling and redness on the side of the neck; mostly fever; possibly swallowing disorder and / or difficult inhalation

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  • Lentil to chestnut-sized, smooth knots in the neck area; painless or painful; sometimes general symptoms such as fever, fatigue; possibly sore throat

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  • (Pressure) painful nodules in the neck area

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  • Painful, reddened nodules in the neck area, often with a central point of pus; often occurring in multiples or repeatedly

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Painless, doughy or resilient Swelling at the bottom of the chin

Causes:

  • Bruising, after injury or when taking anticoagulant medication
  • Floor of the mouth cyst (harmless, congenital malformation that is often only discovered in old age)
  • Chronic inflammation of the mandibular salivary gland

Measure:

  • Wait to see whether the swelling subsides on its own, if not, see your house doctor or ENT doctor in the following weeks

Painless, rough to hard as a board Lump at the bottom of the chin

Causes:

  • Salivary stone in the lower salivary glands
  • Very rare: benign or malignant tumor of the lower salivary glands or the jawbone (bone tumor)
  • Very rare: lymph node metastasis in tumors of the face, sinuses or mouth, e.g. B. Spinalioma

Measure:

  • In the next few days to the ENT doctor or family doctor

Self help:

  • Possibly try to loosen a saliva stone with massaging movements in the direction of the oral cavity

(Pressure) painful, single nodules on the underside of the chin; possibly toothache or pain in the rest of the oral cavity; sometimes recurring

Root cause:

  • Acute or chronic inflammation of the lymph nodes, starting from inflammation in the oral cavity (e.g. root suppuration)

Measure:

  • In the next few days to the dentist if there is pain in the oral cavity

Strong painful, plump to hard Swelling on the bottom of the chin; possibly fever, difficulty swallowing

Causes:

  • Purulent inflammation of the floor of the mouth (Angina Ludovici)
  • Acute inflammation of the salivary glands

Measure:

  • If you have a fever, go to your house doctor or ENT doctor immediately, otherwise within the next few days

Painless swelling on the front of the neck, moving with swallowing; possibly tightness; possibly weight loss, nervousness, sweating or weight gain, slowing down and freezing

Causes:

  • Goiter
  • Hashimoto's thyroiditis (chronic inflammation of the thyroid)
  • Middle (median) cervical cyst
  • Disintegrated thyroid tissue above the normal thyroid

Measure:

  • In the next few weeks to the family doctor or ENT doctor

Painless, growing lump on the front neck; possibly hoarseness; sometimes loud inhalation noise, difficulty swallowing

Causes:

Measure:

  • In the next few days to the house or ENT doctor

Painless swelling on the front neck, can be expressed and fill with air by pressing

Root cause:

  • Bulging of the larynx (air sac, laryngocele)

Measure:

  • In the next few weeks to the ENT doctor

Sudden onset of swelling with a feeling of tightness on the front neck

Root cause:

  • Bleeding into the thyroid gland (chocolate cyst), spontaneous or after injury

Measure:

  • Harmless, but for clarification in the next few days to the house doctor or ENT doctor

Painful, widespread swelling of the anterior neck with fever; often earache; often difficulty swallowing

Causes:

Activities:

  • Immediately to the house doctor or ENT doctor in the event of a high fever, severe pain or poor general well-being
  • Otherwise, see a doctor in the next few days

Moderately tender nodules or swellings on the side of the neck; often signs of cold, moderate to severe sore throat; often fever

Root cause:

Acute lymph node inflammation, v. a. for infections in the ENT area such as

Measure:

  • The next day at the latest to the family doctor if the temperature is over 39 ° C

Self help:

  • Cooling neck wrap
  • Antipyretic drugs

Painless swelling or (mostly) numerous swelling Lumps on the side of the neck and / or above the collarbones; possibly general complaints such as fever, fatigue, night sweats

Causes:

Measure:

In the next few days with the family doctor

  • Rapid multiplication or increase in size of the nodules
  • Caking of nodules
  • General symptoms such as fever, night sweats appear

Painless individual, (mostly) smooth knots on the side of the neck and / or above the collarbones

Causes:

  • (Mostly) benign tumors in skin and connective tissue, e.g. B. adipose tissue growth (lipoma), fibroma (benign growth of the connective tissue)
  • Lateral (lateral) cervical cyst

Measure:

  • See your doctor in the next few weeks if the lumps are growing rapidly or start to hurt

Painless, permanent swelling on the side of the neck, combined with regurgitation of undigested bites

Root cause:

Measure:

  • In the next few weeks to the family doctor

Severely tender, increasing swelling and redness on the side of the neck; mostly fever; possibly swallowing disorder and / or difficult inhalation

Causes:

  • Purulent inflammation of the soft tissues of the neck, e.g. B. Abscess (encapsulated collection of pus), phlegmon (bacterial inflammation of the connective tissue)
  • Inflamed lateral neck cyst (lateral neck cyst)

Measure:

  • On the same day to the family doctor

Lentil to chestnut-sized, smooth knots in the neck area; painless or painful; sometimes general symptoms such as fever, fatigue; possibly sore throat

Causes:

Measure:

  • See your doctor in the next few weeks if the lumps persist for more than a month

(Pressure) painful nodules in the neck area

Causes:

  • Myogelosis (hardening of the muscles) of the neck muscles
  • Inflammation of the lymph nodes caused by diseases of the scalp such as B. atopic dermatitis or psoriasis

Self help:

  • Massage if muscles become stiff, apply heat

Painful, reddened nodules in the neck area, often with a central point of pus; often occurring in multiples or repeatedly

Root cause:

Activities:

  • On the same day to the family doctor in case of severe pain, fever
  • In the next few days, when boils appear more frequently or do not heal

Self help:

  • In the case of "immature" boils, possibly apply pulling ointment

Your pharmacy recommends

Massage out salivary stones.

Sufferers can try, just like the doctor, to loosen salivary stones with gentle, regular massages so that they are flushed out with the saliva. The method is particularly suitable for salivary stones that are close to the exit of the gland. You will be gently massaged towards the exit of the gland. The gland outlets are visible as dark or shiny points in the oral mucosa: in the case of the mandibular salivary gland below the tongue, to the side of the ligamentous ligament and in the case of the parotid gland in the cheek about at the level of the first upper molar. Stimulating the flow of saliva (e.g. with lemon juice) supports the movement of the salivary stone.

Cooling neck wrap.

Cool neck wraps help with swelling and pain caused by acute lymph node inflammation in the neck area. To do this, dip a linen cloth folded lengthways into cold water, wring it out and spread it around the affected area. Then wrap the linen cloth with a towel. After about 20-30 minutes - but at the latest when the wrap has warmed up - remove the wrap and replace it with a dry silk or cotton scarf.

Self-medication.

If the fever and / or severe pain persist or worsen, e.g. Over-the-counter medicines can help, for example in connection with a sore throat or tonsillitis. Suitable are e.g. B. Medicines with the active ingredients paracetamol, ibuprofen or acetylsalicylic acid (ASA), which have an antipyretic and analgesic effect. They are i.a. available as tablets, granules, juice or suppositories. It should be taken for a maximum of 3 days without consulting a doctor. It is also important to strictly adhere to the dosage recommendations. Paracetamol is suitable for both pregnant women and children. Ibuprofen is not suitable in the last trimester of pregnancy and may only be given to children from the age of 6 months. Acetylsalicylic acid should not be used by pregnant women and children under 12 years of age.

Pull ointments. So-called "draft ointments" (e.g. with shale oil or turpentine) promote the ripening of boils and abscesses. They also have an antibacterial, anti-inflammatory and analgesic effect and are used for supportive treatment after consultation with the doctor. Apply the ointment thickly to the affected skin area once a day and put a bandage over it. The next time the bandage is changed, wash off dried-on remnants of the ointment with lukewarm water and a little mild soap.

Note: When using it, it should be noted that pull ointments have an intense odor and dark ointments can discolour clothing.

Physical procedures.

In the case of hardened muscles, massages and heat applications have a relaxing effect and relieve pain. There are numerous options for applying heat, from hot water bottles or heat pillows to a warm full bath. Warm wraps (e.g. fango) or blood circulation-promoting ointments and plasters (e.g. with capsicum, the active ingredient in chillies) are particularly suitable for the neck area.

Authors

Dr. med. Arne Schäffler; Dr. med. Brigitte Strasser-Vogel; Section "Your pharmacy recommends": Dr. med. Arne Schäffler; Miriam Knauer | last changed on at 09:01


Important note: This article has been written according to scientific standards and has been checked by medical professionals. The information communicated in this article can in no way replace professional advice in your pharmacy. The content cannot and must not be used to make independent diagnoses or to start therapy.