How do I tie a good knot

Knot instructions


Figure eight knot

Synonyms: tie-in knot; Rope knot

The figure eight knot is one of the most closely related loop knots, so it is used as a tie-in loop by the fire brigade, the THW and surveillance. It is characterized by a particularly high level of strength. The knot owes its name to the similarity to the Arabic numeral 8. The figure-eight knot can be easily undone again, even after heavy use, compared to the sack stitch or spar stitch. Furthermore, the knot does not loosen even under a ring load, which is a very important aspect, especially when climbing.


The figure eight knot with instructions

Synonyms: tie-in knot, rope knot

The figure-of-eight knot is commonly used these days to tie a loop. The proven tensile strength is extremely high, which means that the knot can also be used in rescue services and climbing without any problems. The shape gave the figure of eight its name. Even after a lot of stress, it can be opened easily. The figure eight knot is suitable for use on a climbing harness.


Eight knot in 4 steps - instructions

Synonyms: Endacht

The eight knot, also known as the end eight, is a particularly safe, easy-to-learn knot that is used in many areas. In sailing, for example, it is tied to the end of a rope to prevent it from slipping out of rollers or threads. The name of the knot comes from the similarity to the Arabic number 8. Compared to the spar or sack stitch, the figure-eight knot can be easily undone again after a lot of stress.


Double figure eight knot in teardrop shape - instructions with photos

Synonyms:

The double eight knot is a particularly safe and extremely strong knot for connecting two equally strong ropes. The name of the knot comes from the similarity to the Arabic number 8. The teardrop-shaped double eight knot is tied like an end eight with two ends of the rope.


Eight knots, double and pinned - instructions with photos

Synonyms:

The double eight knot is a particularly safe and extremely strong knot for connecting two equally strong ropes. The name of the knot comes from the similarity to the Arabic number 8. The double figure eight knot in the pinned shape is initially tied with a loose figure eight knot, in order to then follow the knot backwards with the second rope.


The simple anchor stitch - instructions with photos

Synonyms: Schlingenstek; Lark head; Anchor knot; Double loop

The anchor stitch knot is a knot that is tightened under weight and can even be tied with one hand if necessary. Even after a heavy load, it can be easily removed again. You should make sure that the anchor stitch is not loaded on one side, otherwise there is a risk that it will come off by itself! It is therefore sensible to use it in conjunction with a closed loop or sling.


The Bulin 1.5 in a few steps - instructions with photos

Synonyms:

The Bulin 1.5 is the most tear-resistant knot used in mountain sports and rescue services. With the 67% of the rope's tensile strength, it is superior to that of the figure eight knot with 63%. Despite the superiority in terms of tear resistance, the figure-of-eight knot is preferred due to its poor verifiability. The plugged-in version of the Bulin 1.5 is used for use on the climbing harness.


Half a stroke - instructions with photos

Synonyms: half stroke

Half a beat is one of the basics of tying knots. It is used as an accessory to many knots and can enclose a rope or other object.


The half-mast cast in 4 steps - instructions with photos

Synonyms: HMS; Half-mast protection

The half-mast is one of the most versatile safety knots used in mountain sports. It is mainly used for dynamic belaying and in some special situations also for abseiling. The knot can be made in two different variants.


The square knot in four steps - instructions with photos

Synonyms: flat knot, reef knot, hercules knot, double overhand knot, reff stitch, boy scout knot, double stitch, double knot, right knot, weaver knot, samaritan knot

The square knot is a very easy to learn knot that can be used for short-term connection of two ropes. In order to achieve a permanent and safe connection between two ropes, instead of the square knot, you should use the double eight knot, the sheet hanger or even the double sheet hitch, as this has a significantly higher tear resistance. The square knot is particularly easy to open after heavy loads. This is done by pulling on the two loose ends of the rope, which loosens the knot and can now be easily undone. The square knot should not be used in climbing, or anywhere where human lives depend on the knot!


The lasso knot from the wild west - instructions with photos

Synonyms:

The lasso knot is a well-known knot from bygone times that was used to catch wild horses. In part, it is still used today by South American gauchos to catch cattle.


The mast throw in 5 steps - instructions with photos

Synonyms: Linen hitch, figure eight loop, tie tree, cross clank, rib knot, pretzel knot

The mast throw is particularly suitable for tying a rope to an object and is particularly easy to learn and can even be tied with one hand. However, if the mast throw is unilaterally loaded, it can come loose. The knot can be tied in the different variants, pinned and thrown. It serves as a stand knot when climbing and can be varied in length without loosening the knot.


The mated mast throw in 4 steps - instructions with photos

Synonyms: Linen hitch, figure eight loop, tie tree, cross clank, rib knot, pretzel knot

The mast throw is a very easy to learn knot that is mainly used for mooring. With a little practice you can even knot it with one hand. The mast throw can come off unintentionally if the load is on one side. In mountain sports it is used as a stand node. Whereby it can be adjusted in length without having to untie the knot.


The laid nine knot - instructions with photos

Synonyms:

The nine knot is a further development of the eight knot, so the nine knot has an additional twist. The knot doesn't look like a nine either, as one might suspect. It is said to be safer than the figure eight knot.


The tied nine knot - instructions with photos

Synonyms:

This knot is based on the figure eight knot, it has an additional twist. It is installed in cable cars and is even more tear-resistant than the figure-eight knot.


The laid double bowline - instructions with photos

Synonyms: double bulin

The double bowline, in addition to the figure eight knot, is very often used in mountain sports. It mainly serves as an easily detachable tie-in knot. However, since the knot pattern is more difficult to control, the figure of eight is recommended as a tie-in knot on the climbing harness.


The double bowline - instructions with photos

Synonyms: Double bulin stuck

The double bowline is used in mountain sports as a tie-in knot. The inserted double bowline is suitable for use on a climbing harness. However, since the control of the knot is quite difficult, the figure eight knot is preferred.


The left bowline - instructions with photos

Synonyms: Bulin; Shear rope knot; Lifeline; Fire department rescue knot

The bowline is generally an extremely common maritime knot that can be used to tie a tight loop. The noose cannot tighten in any direction. With the bowline, however, there is a risk that it can come loose when a ring load is applied. For this reason, the figure eight knot, the "Bulin 1.5" or the double Bulin is usually used in climbing. There are some proverbs to help you memorize the knot, for example "The rabbit comes out of the hole, around the tree and back into the hole." There are two different variants of the simple bowline, the left and the right bowline. The bowline on the right also withstands mutual loads compared to the left.


The right bowline - instructions with photos

Synonyms: Bulin; Shear rope knot; Lifeline; Fire department rescue knot; Stake stitch

The bowline is a very popular seaman's knot with which you can tie a tight loop and which cannot be pulled in any direction. With simple bulin, however, there is a risk that it will loosen when subjected to ring loading. Therefore, the figure eight knot, the "Bulin 1.5" or the double bulin is often used in climbing. In order to be able to memorize the procedure for tying the knot better, there are some donkey bridges. For example, "A snake emerges from the pond, crawls around the tree once and then dives back into the pond." Basically there are still two different variants, namely the Bulin with an outer (the so-called right bowline) or inner (left bowline) end of the rope. The difference is that the right bowline can withstand changing loads, whereas the left bowline can come loose.


The Prusik knot in 4 steps - instructions with photos

Synonyms:

In climbing, the Prusik knot is mainly used as a clamping knot that tightens when the rope is loaded and loosens when it is relieved. There is a distinction between long and short Prusik knots. The name depends on the length of the Prusik loop used. The knot owes its name to Mr. Karl Prusik.


The one and a half round tour - instructions with photos

Synonyms:

The one and a half round trip, one of the basic knot forms, denotes a one and a half times enclosure of an object.


The tour in two steps - instructions with photos

Synonyms:

A round trip is one of the basic forms of many knots. It describes a simple enclosure of an object. The round trip can also be carried out several times, whereby the version with one and a half round trips is probably the most related.


Schotstek - version for connecting two equally strong ropes

Synonyms: weaver's cross knot, back stitch, crossed weaver's knot, samaritan knot, jam knot, pod stitch

The Schotstek is still used today when tying fishing nets or hammocks. In fishing, the Schotstek, there it is called a jam knot, serves as a connection between the leader and the flying line. With the Schotstek it is important that both loose ends of the rope come out on the same side (see picture), otherwise the knot loses a large part of its strength!


Schotstek - version for connecting two different strength ropes

Synonyms: weaver's cross knot, back stitch, crossed weaver's knot, samaritan knot, jam knot, pod stitch

This knot is used when tying fishing nets or hammocks. When fishing, it is used to connect the leader to the flying line. Here it is also called a jam knot. When knotting, make sure that the loose ends of the rope come out on the same side of the knot.


Instructions for the Slipstek

Synonyms: half knot with winding loop, slip knot

The Slipstek is used for temporary attachment to bars or eyelets. It is also used as a stopper at the end of the rope to prevent the rope from slipping. The Slipstek should only be used for mooring if the diameter of the object to be enclosed does not deviate significantly from that of the rope. There is also the risk that it will come off by itself in the event of heavy or changing loads.


How to for the Slipstek - instructions with photos

Synonyms: half knot with winding loop, slip knot

The knot is mainly used for short-term fastening to bars or eyelets, but also as a stopper at the end of the rope. You should make sure that you only use the knot if the object you want to enclose is about as thick as the rope you are using. The Slipstek can easily loosen in the event of a strong or alternating load!


The double spar stitch in line form - instructions with photos

Synonyms:

The double spar stitch is mainly used to permanently and safely connect two ropes of the same strength. The teardrop shape of the knot is suitable for alpine sports, as it does not easily get stuck in crevices when abseiling.


The double spar stitch in teardrop shape

Synonyms:

This knot is used to permanently connect two equally strong ropes. In climbing, the drop-shaped variant is usually used, as it cannot easily get stuck in the crevice.


The spar stitch in a few steps

Synonyms: fishing knot, fishing knot

The spar stitch is mainly used to connect two equally strong ropes with each other. Today the simple sack stitch is more used, as the spar stitch is more difficult to knot. In addition, it is much more difficult to check the knotted spar stitch and thus overlook a mistake that is often made, that of incorrect cross-stitching.


The overhand knot in next to no time

Synonyms: ordinary lay

The overhand knot is one of the basics of knot tying. It is used as a safety accessory for many knots and can enclose a rope or other object.